Category Archives: iPhone

Jailbreak iPhone 3Gs 3.1.3 with Spirit & iTunes 9.2.0.61 on Windows 7

The following guide will help you jailbreak iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS (all versions) untethered on the latest iPhone OS 3.1.3.

Step 1: Download Spirit for Windows.

Step 2: Connect iPhone with your computer, Run “Spirit” and then Click on “Jailbreak”:

Note for Windows 7 Users: Change the “Compatibility mode” to “Windows XP (Service Pack 3)” by right clicking on “Spirit.exe”, and then click on “Properties”. This can be seen in the screenshot below.

Also check: “Run this program as an administrator” option on the same window.

Step 3: Let the app do its thing and wait for the app to show “Jailbreak Complete!” message. At this point, wait for the iPhone to automatically reboot.

Step 4: Voila! You should now have a fully jailbroken iPhone 3G/3GS running on firmware 3.1.2 or 3.1.3 – Untethered !.

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Poor iPhone 4 signal? You’re holding it wrong, Jobs says

Fri Jun 25, 11:11 am ET
Yep, turns out the lower left corner of the iPhone 4’s antenna-housing stainless-steel rim is sensitive to human skin, so much so that your AT&T reception may drop precipitously when you hold the phone on the left side. Steve Jobs’ advice: Don’t hold it like that.

That’s the response Ars Technica got from a query to Apple corporate — with Jobs cc’d — about the iPhone 4’s widely reported reception issues, which seem to strike if your hand covers the lower left corner of the phone, particularly near a thin black stripe across the steel band that rings the phone.

For the record, Jobs’ exact reply to Ars was: “All phones have sensitive areas. Just avoid holding it that way.”

Meanwhile, a reader over at TUAW (The Unofficial Apple Weblog) who asked Jobs via e-mail whether the iPhone 4 reception problem was due to a “design flaw” got a similar response: “Nope. Just don’t hold it that way.”

After a little back-and-forth with a second TUAW reader, Jobs’ answer eventually morphed into a somewhat more corporate phrasing:

“Gripping any phone will result in some attenuation of its antenna performance, with certain places being worse than others depending on the placement of the antennas. This is a fact of life for every wireless phone. If you ever experience this on your iPhone 4, avoid gripping it in the lower left corner in a way that covers both sides of the black strip in the metal band, or simply use one of many available cases.”

While Jobs denies that the iPhone 4’s sensitive lower left corner is a “design flaw,” one can’t help but second-guess Apple’s decision to boost the iPhone 4’s reception by essentially turning the steel band that encircles the handset into a big antenna — an idea that sounds great on paper, but as my fellow Yahoo! News blogger Chris Null points out, antennas don’t necessarily react that well to being touched.

I’m having no problem re-creating the iPhone 4’s reception woes. Just now, I dialed the Moviefone number while holding the iPhone in my fingertips: perfect reception, with five bars, all loud and clear. But once I cupped the iPhone in my hand on the left side, touching that lower-left corner, the AT&T reception bars began to disappear one by one, until finally the Moviefone guy went silent and a “Call Failed” notification popped up.

To be fair, though, I should point out that when my hand isn’t in contact with the specific no-touch zone in the lower left corner, reception on my iPhone 4 seems markedly better than it was on my iPhone 3GS. Usually I have to resort to Skype when trying to make voice calls in my apartment (believe me, I’ve become quite the Skyper in the past year or so). In my testing so far, however, regular voice calls on the iPhone 4 have gone through without a hitch, and I’ve yet to fall back on Skype.

Why has my new iPhone not been dropping calls one after another, given its aversion to being touched? Well, now that I’m paying attention, I’ve noticed that when I’m making iPhone voice calls, I usually hold the handset with just my fingertips rather than cupping it in my palm. I’m also right-handed, which means if I do end up touching its bottom corner with the base of my palm, it’s usually on the right side, not the left side.

But that’s just me. What if your habit is to hold a phone the (ahem) “wrong” way? You might have to resort to buying one of Apple’s $30 Bumper iPhone cases, which seems to cure the iPhone 4 reception problems. (Kinda makes you wonder, right?)

Now, as Jobs points out, other makes and models of phones also suffer reception problems when they’re held the “wrong” way. Still, the bottom line from Apple seems to be that this is just another iPhone quirk we have to live with, similar to the 3.5mm headset jack on the original iPhone that would only take headset jacks specifically designed to fit its unusually narrow opening.

In other words, it’s not the phone’s fault. We’re just using it wrong. Silly us.

Next iPhone has clearer screen, coming out June 24

Apple CEO Steve Jobs introduces the new iPhone 4 at the Apple Worldwide Developers Conference, Monday,

The next iPhone comes out June 24 and will have a higher-resolution screen, longer battery life and thinner design.
CEO Steve Jobs opened Apple Inc.’s annual conference for software developers Monday by revealing the iPhone 4, which will cost $199 or $299 in the U.S. with a two-year AT&T contract, depending on the capacity. The iPhone 3GS, which debuted last year, will still be available, for $99.

The iPhone 4 is about three-eighths of an inch thick; the previous iPhone was nearly half an inch. It is getting a camera on the front that could be used for videoconferencing, in addition to a five-megapixel camera and a flash on the back. It can shoot high-definition video, catching up to some other smart phones.
The display on the new iPhone remains 3.5 inches diagonally, but Jobs said it can show four times as many pixels — the individual colored dots that make up an image — as the previous screen.

The new phone will run the latest version of Apple’s mobile software, now called iOS4, which Apple unveiled in April to offer such new features as the ability to operate more than one program at a time. Older iPhones will be able to get iOS4 as a download June 21.

New applications for the device will include the popular game Farmville and one from Netflix that lets people watch streaming video where they left off on a PC.

How to Make Custom iPhone Ringtones with Windows 7, iTunes 9 and Audacity 1.2.6

iTunes 9 will automatically create a new folder for storing ringtones in your music library the first time you open a .m4r file, provided you have the “Keep iTunes Music Folder Organized” option checked. This folder is where you’ll want to put your ringtone files, but first you’ll need to edit the song down to a suitable size. The size of an allowed ringtone on the iPhone tops out at around 3 megabytes.

For Mac users, there are several ways to whittle down your tracks. You could use Apple’s Quicktime Pro or Garageband if you have them. You can also edit MP3s in the free Audion 3, which features a nice waveform editing tool. Windows users can edit audio files with the free Audacity 1.2.6Pick the 20 to 30 seconds you want to use as your ringtone, and save the file as an MP3.

  1. Download Lame For Audacity on Windows: Lame_v3.98.2_for_Audacity_on_Windows.exeLAME is a library that allows some programs to encode MP3 files. For more information about LAME in general, click here. LAME is free, but in some countries you may need to pay a license fee in order to legally encode MP3 files.

    Once you have unzipped the archive, you will have a file called lame_enc.dll, LameLib or libmp3lame.dylib. To use it with Audacity, you can put it anywhere you want, but the first time you want to export an MP3 file, Audacity will ask you for the location of this file, so you’ll want to remember where you put it.

  2. Add the shortened MP3 file to your iTunes library/playlist, then right-click on it in iTunes and choose “Convert Selection to AAC.” The clip will need to be an AAC file in order to be used as a ringtone. (The options available in the context menu regarding import format is dictated by the setting in Preferences/General/Import Settings. Choose the AAC encoder to get the option to convert to AAC.)
  3. Right-click on the AAC converted file and choose “Show in Windows Explorer” to locate the converted file.
  4. Change the file extension from .m4a to .m4r, and double-click the .m4r file to play it in the “Ringtones” folder in your music library. This file will be added to your iTunes library automatically. (Some are reporting a size limit for the music file, so if you have trouble, using a smaller file may help)
  5. Finally, click on your iPhone in iTunes, and go to the Ringtones section. You should now see your new ringtone.
  6. If you want to be sure about the sync, feel free to click “Selected ringtones:” and check off the file explicitly, though this shouldn’t be required.
  7. Now SYNC your phone. You’re Done!

Since both Windows and Mac OS X like to hide file extensions, the renaming part can be tricky. Make sure you aren’t just appending a file extension to the hidden one. On a Mac, choose “Get Info” in the Finder and make sure “Hide extension” is unchecked. In Windows, make sure the “Hide extensions for known file types” option in Windows Explorer is turned off.

When you sync your iPhone, you should see the new ringtones displayed in your phone’s sound settings.

How to run Flash on an iPhone (no jailbreak required)

By Scott Colvey on Wednesday, 13 August 2008

Look, we’ll be honest – what we’re about to reveal isn’t at all practical but if there’s a Flash-laden website that you really, really want to access from your iPhone then we’ve found a way to just that.

You won’t need to jailbreak the handset or do anything that might otherwise enrage Apple or your carrier. However, we stress again that we can’t conceive of many situations where this little idea of ours will be all that useful but, as our screenshots show, it IS possible to get an iPhone to display Flash content. How? Well, it’ll cost you a click, teasing tykes that we are. In other words, the answer is after the cut.

The trick involves using VNC-alike tool LogMeIn to launch the Flash-content-laden site on a web browser window running on a remote PC. As LogMeIn works under the Safari browser, it is then possible to view the Flash content on the iPhone. But – and frankly, it’s a rather large BUT – the results can be so frustratingly slow, even over a local Wi-Fi connection, that you may wonder why you’re bothering.

For instance, for this post we tried to video Safari running LogMeIn running a remote web browser window running a Flash video on the Adobe home page, but gave up because the frame rate appeared to be around one every five seconds.

So that there’s little point in trying it, other than for curiosity’s sake. But if you’re bored, LogMeIn Free is, er, free, so give it a go and let us know how you get on.

AT&T iPhone trade-in/trade-up rumors

AT&T iPhone trade-in/trade-up rumors

Posted by Will on Thursday, June 12th, 2008 at 6:16 pm under Cingular/AT&T, iPhone, Apple, Announcements

Okay, so there are some rumors swirling the intertubes that indicate AT&T’s intention to allow current iPhone customers to trade-in or trade-up their first-generation iPhone in exchange for the subsdized, lower $200 (or $300 for the 16GB variant) price-point for the iPhone 3G. I just wanted to give our readers a heads-up (and reiterate my previous post) on what’s really going on here.

AT&T will be offering their iPhone customers that bought an iPhone on or after May 27, 2008 the option to swap their current iPhone for an iPhone 3G – at no additional cost. In Apple iPhone 3Gfact, AT&T will be refunding the cost differential between the first-generation iPhone and the iPhone 3G! Now that’s an incredible offer.

ALL other iPhone customers that bought their iPhone BEFORE the May 27, 2008 cut-off date can still buy the new iPhone 3G 8GB for just $200, or $300 for the iPhone 3G 16GB, by signing a new two-year contract and adding on the unlimited 3G data plan. There’s NO NEED TO SWAP your current iPhone for the subsidized pricing. As long as you sign that new contract (which replaces your current AT&T contract, regardless of how long you have left on your current contract) with a 3G data package, you’ll get the low-price offer and get to keep you old iPhone.

Of course, your phone number will be ported to your new iPhone 3G, so your old iPhone won’t be anything more than a thicker iPod Touch. So, you might as well gift it or sell it. Just make sure you wipe your personal data beforehand – don’t say we didn’t warn you.

How to Make Custom iPhone Ringtones with iTunes 7.5 and Audacity

Shortly after the release of iTunes 7.5 users noticed that the main difference between ringtones and regular audio files were their file extensions. Regular AAC files have the file extension .m4a, while ringtones use the file extension .m4r.

iTunes 7.5 will automatically create a new folder for storing ringtones in your music library the first time you open a .m4r file, provided you have the “Keep iTunes Music Folder Organized” option checked. This folder is where you’ll want to put your ringtone files, but first you’ll need to edit the song down to a suitable size. The size of an allowed ringtone on the iPhone tops out at around 3 megabytes.

For Mac users, there are several ways to whittle down your tracks. You could use Apple’s Quicktime Pro or Garageband if you have them. You can also edit MP3s in the free Audion 3, which features a nice waveform editing tool. Windows users can edit audio files with the free Audacity. Pick the 20 to 30 seconds you want to use as your ringtone, and save the file as an MP3.

  1. Add the shortened MP3 file to your iTunes library, then right-click on it in iTunes and choose “Convert Selection to AAC.” The clip will need to be an AAC file in order to be used as a ringtone.
  2. Right-click on the AAC converted file and choose “Show in Windows Explorer” to locate the converted file.
  3. Change the file extension from .m4a to .m4r, and double-click the .m4r file to play it in the “Ringtones” folder in your music library. This file will be added to your iTunes library automatically. (Some are reporting a size limit for the music file, so if you have trouble, using a smaller file may help)
  4. Finally, click on your iPhone in iTunes, and go to the Ringtones section. You should now see your new ringtone.
  5. If you want to be sure about the sync, feel free to click “Selected ringtones:” and check off the file explicitly, though this shouldn’t be required.
  6. Now SYNC your phone. You’re Done!

Since both Windows and Mac OS X like to hide file extensions, the renaming part can be tricky. Make sure you aren’t just appending a file extension to the hidden one. On a Mac, choose “Get Info” in the Finder and make sure “Hide extension” is unchecked. In Windows, make sure the “Hide extensions for known file types” option in Windows Explorer is turned off.

When you sync your iPhone, you should see the new ringtones displayed in your phone’s sound settings.

*Update* How to Make Custom iPhone Ringtones with Windows 7, iTunes 9 and Audacity 1.2.6